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Book of Mormon Day Reading

The Book of Mormon first went up for sale on March 26, 1830, at the E.B. Grandin Bookstore in Palmyra, NY. Tomorrow will mark the 187th anniversary of that occasion. In those intervening years, the book has had a major impact on countless lives—including my own. I love the Book of Mormon, and have a firm testimony of its truth. I can personally tell you that research into all kinds of questions about the book has only served to strengthen my testimony. It is a remarkable book, which will wear you out long before you make a dent in it, as Hugh Nibley said (pretty sure that is a direct quote, but too lazy to double check).

For those who would like to reflect on the Book of Mormon’s coming forth and long term impact in the last (almost) two centuries, I’ve compiled the following list of KnoWhys from Book of Mormon Central.
  
Moroni’s Visits to Joseph Smith

Translation

Witnesses

Transmission and Impact

Joseph Smith


While there are more I could include, I think this includes all the KnoWhys which have the most relevance to the coming forth of the Book of Mormon. I hope these can enhance your appreciation for people (in this dispensation) who helped bring this book forth and the sacrifices they made so we could have this book today.

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