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Mormon Lent, Day 4

We did not get all the translations in until pretty late last night, but we did each get it done. Yesterday was 1 Peter 5:6:

Stephen (from Greek):
Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God, so that he may raise you all up in due time.
Jasmin (also from Greek):
Lower yourselves, therefore, under the powerful hand of God, so that he may raise [you] up in the proper time.
Neal (from Latin):
Humble yourselves, therefore, under the potent hand of God, so that he may exalt you in the time of visitation.
Just a note with regard to the Latin. On Facebook, I have “Humble yourself,” but after seeing both Jasmin and Stephen use the plural yourselves, I went back to double check, and sure enough the Latin humiliāminī is indeed in the second-person plural imperative. So I have corrected that here.

I also suspect that vīsitātiōnis (“of visitation”) probably has some sort of implied meaning of “proper” or “due,” and that I rendered the phrase overly literally. But I am not immersed in the reading of Latin, and certainly not familiar with the vulgar Latin of the Vulgate, enough to be familiar with all those sorts of nuances, so I figure as long as it makes reasonable sense, I am best off being as literal as I can be.  

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