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Mormon Lent, Day 7

Stephen was the only one to remember yesterday, but he remembered too late for Jasmin and me, apparently. But we still all three translated Joel 2:1–2:

Stephen (from Hebrew):
Blow a trumpet in Zion! Sound an alarm in my holy mountain! All of the inhabitants of the land shall tremble, for the day of Yahweh approaches; it is near! A day of darkness and gloom, of clouds and thick darkness. Like twilight spread out over the mountains, a people great and terrible! None have been like them from the days of yore, nor indeed again after them, generation to generation.
Jasmin (from Greek):
Sound the war trumpet in Zion! Herald in my holy mountain!
And all who dwell on the earth will dissolve, Because the day of the Lord approaches, even very near. A day of darkness and darkness A day of cloud and fog. As dawn will pour out upon the hills, a people great and strong. There has not been from the beginning one like it, And after it there shall not be again, Even until the years into generations of generations.

Neal (from Latin):
Sound the trumpet in Zion! Howl in my sacred mountain! Let all the inhabitants of the earth be disturbed, because the day of the Lord approaches, for its nigh. A day of darkness and of gloom, a day of covering and whirlwind. As the early morning expanded upon the mountains, a nation mighty and brave! There was nothing like it from the beginning, and will not be afterwards, on through the years, generations after generations.  

For most of v. 2, I had to translate very loosely because a more literal translation was incoherent. 

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