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A Great Opportunity Revisited

A gorgeous view of Lake Atitlan, one of the many beautiful places
you can visit and learn about with Dr. Mark Wright
Back in April, I posted some information about an LDS tour of Mesoamerica, which will have a Book of Mormon theme, of course. As I said then, this is a great opportunity because Dr. Mark Wright, of BYU, is one of the very best scholars of both the Book of Mormon and of Mesoamerica.

Back in April, I lamented that my circumstances would not allow me to go. Alas, circumstances change, and mine have changed in a big way. I may talk more about that at another time. For now, the point is now I can go on this trip, and I could not be more excited! Again, like I said in April, it is nice to read, and to think, and to write about all of this stuff. And pictures really help make it come alive. But there just is nothing like actually being there. So I am excited and grateful to have this opportunity.

But I am not writing this to brag. Rather, registration for the trip is closing soon and I want to encourage anybody who can come to jump in before it too late. In addition to Mark, at least two others (neither of which is me) who have spent decades studying the Book of Mormon from a Mesoamerican perspective will be there. And another friend of mine, Stephen Smoot, who has lots of insights into the Book of Mormon from an ancient Near Eastern perspective, will also be going. I am truly the least of all these, but I’ll be there, for what that might be worth to you.

Truly this is an opportunity not to be missed. There will be a veritable treasure trove of insights into the Book of Mormon waiting to be opened in late night hotel lobbies and bus rides.

Once again, details on the tour are available here.

For more information on Mark Wright, see here and here.


I honestly don’t think an opportunity this good will come around terribly often. If you have any interest at all in going to Mesoamerica, the time is now!

Comments

  1. I'm glad you're not down there right now--Hurricane Patricia looks terrifying. I'm keeping the people in its crosshairs in my prayers tonight.

    ~Jon

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Looks like things weren't as bad as the stories made them sound. Glad they made it through with much less damage than I would've expected for a storm that powerful.

      ~Jon

      Delete

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