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A Great Opportunity

Tikal: One of many awesome places you can visit and learn about with Dr. Mark Wright
I have frequently commented on Book of Mormon geography, archaeology, etc. here on this blog. While reading and thinking and writing on these things is nice, and maps and photographs can do a lot to help a person visualize something, nothing is even half as good and going there yourself. I hope to have the opportunity to go too many places relevant to the Book of Mormon someday—Israel, maybe some places on the Arabian Peninsula, Guatemala, and central Mexico. At present, I need to save up for school and whatever else life has in-store for me in the near future. But I really, really, REALLY wish I could go to Mesoamerica this winter.

Why? Because Mark Wright, one of the best and brightest LDS Mesoamericanists, is leading a tour this winter, from December 26–January 4. I don’t have the words to express how incredible this opportunity is. While I mean no disrespect to others who lead such tours, I can promise you that no other tour guide else will be able to deliver the same level of expertise on both Mesoamerica and the Book of Mormon. If this is something of interest to you, I strongly recommend you take this incredible opportunity to learn and experience the Book of Mormon like you never have before.

You can get more information on the tour here.


You can get more information on Dr. Wright and some of his publications here and here.   

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