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An Open Letter (#2) to Jeremy Runnells

The “Letter to a CES Director,” written by Jeremy T. Runnells, has been making its rounds online and growing in popularity for some time now. Runnells lays out his laundry list of issues that caused him to lose his faith.

This my second letter in response to the CES Letter. The first can be accessed here. You should read the first before reading this one. This is where I actually engage with his reasons for rejecting the historicity of the Book of Mormon. Again, due to length (21 pages), I have put it in a PDF document, pagination is continued from the previous letter.

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