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Greg Smith Paper on Mormon Stories/John Dehlin Published


For those who are not already aware, but are interested, the paper by Greg Smith, which spawned controversy this last summer, has been posted on the Interpreter website. There maybe a more formal “publishing” of the finalized, type-set paper in the days to come, but it is now there for the world to see.

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