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BLOG UPDATE: AUGUST 2012


Well, August has been a productive month, compared to more recent efforts. Nonetheless, tomorrow it is back to school for me, which means the usual acknowledge meant that blogging will become less of a priority. Given that even over the summer, I only managed about 1 post a month, this may mean that some months might pass without any new material, although one post a month will still be my goal. Here are few updates relevant either to this blog, myself personally, LDS apologetics generally, or some combination of the three:


Reviewing the Review

Recent events at the Maxwell institute have lead to a discontinuing of the Mormon Studies Review, at least temporarily. Since there are still many great back issues, I will still continue to do my “Reviewing the Review” series. Whether this will expand to any new issues in the future will be determined if and when the Review is revived.

New Online Journal Interpreter

In the wake of the recent events at the Maxwell Institute has come a new online journal in the field of Mormon Studies. Daniel C. Peterson and others who were once associated with what people are referring to as “classic FARMS”, have come together to create the independent journal Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture. This is a very exciting development, and they have already published three articles and a book review. Additional evidence of how quickly this has taken off is the fact that they already have their first sponsored conference inSeptember. If you explore the website enough, you will find that I have managed to get myself involved with this new venture, which may also lead to less activity here on this blog.

BYU Football

My passion for BYU football rarely gets mentioned on this blog. Each year, the football season becomes a time commitment for me, though, and this year it will be even more so. You see, my oldest brother has a greatBYU Football blog that has grown nicely over the years, and this year I promised him I would help out with some of the coverage. So, again, this may slow my production pace.
As usual, I just want to thank everyone for reading and ensure whatever readers that may actually exist that plan to continue doing the best that I can to provide valuable and insightful thoughts on LDS scholarship and apologetics. 

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