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2011 FAIR Conference


            Last year I attended the FAIR Conference for the first time and really enjoyed it. So this year I am going back. For those interested in Mormon Studies, or (more particularly) Mormon Apologetics, I strongly encourage you to attend.

            Last year there was ground-breaking research unveiled for the first time on the Kirtland Egyptian Papers and their connection to the Book of Abraham. This year will feature several speakers on a variety of topics. Here are just a few presentations that interest me in particular:

Stephen D. Ricks, “The Sacred Embrace in Ancient Egyptian Religion and Art”

Brant Gardner, “The Gift and Power: Translating the Book of Mormon”

Steven C. Harper, “Accounts of the First Vision”

Newell Bringhurst, “The 2012 Presidential Race and the Mormon Question” (As a political science major, I can’t help but get excited when my major and my hobby intersect like this!)

Don Bradley, “‘President Joseph Has Translated a Portion’: Solving the Mystery of the Kinderhook Plates” (This one sounds very promising…though I fear the title might be promising too much…I hope not though!)

Paul Fields, “Book of Mormon ‘Wordprint’ Analysis: How to do it wrong…and how to do it right” (My very good friend from high school, who recently finished his undergrad at BYU and has received a full-ride scholarship [or something like that] to Harvard for his graduate work, helped collect the research and data for this presentation)

Chris Watkins, “Excavating the Text: Archaeological Expectations for the Book of Mormon Peoples”

            There are several more presentations as well. The FAIR Bookstore also sets up shop at the conference and offers a lot of books as a discount price.

            For more information, click here. To get your tickets, click here.

Comments

  1. Neal, expect to pleasantly surprised! =)

    BTW, how do you pronounce your last name?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey Don!

    Thanks for taking the time to visit my little, largely irrelevant, space on the internet. ;)

    I really look forward to what you have to offer this year, since the Kinderhook plates remain (in my view) one of the more confusing events in early LDS History. I hope you really have solved the mystery (also, I hope my comments in the posting didn't offend you, I just try to temper my expectations sometimes).

    My last name is pronounced Rapp-LEE. I know the "Y" in there really throws people off, they want to say it Rappl-EYE.

    ReplyDelete

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