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BLOG UPDATE: OCT 2010

As I am sure many (that is, if there is even "many" who actually read this blog) have noticed that my rate of new posts has gone down since when I first got started. The reason for this is with school having started (among other things), I have much less time for apologetic related activities. My current goal is to post once a month during school, and then I will get back to more frequent posts in the summer.

Also, because I want to make sure all who come across this blog understand clearly what this is about, I have added a new "About" page, which links back to each of my original introductory posts, and provides a brief explanation as to what apologetics is, as this has caused some confusion for some who seem to think that it means to say "we are sorry we believe this way." I recommend that all who are new or first time visitors make the about page your first stop.

Lastly, as I continue to expand and develop this blog into what I hope will be an interesting, insightful, and useful resource for LDS scholarly and apologetic information, I will be periodically giving "Blog Updates" like this post.

Thanks for all those who have thus far taken the to time to read and comment here, and I especially thank those who have helped spread the word about LDS Reason and Revelation.

Comments

  1. Completely understand, Neal. School does take up a lot of time. It doesn't get any easier once you're done, at least, when you have a family.

    ReplyDelete

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