Skip to main content

HONEST COMMUNICATION: CHRISTIAN OR NON-CHRISTIAN?


LDS apologist Jeff Lindsey quotes an email received once from someone who was questioning the LDS Church’s right to claim the label of Christian. In that email, the unidentified critic says:

“The beliefs that you profess are not commonly considered ‘Christian’.... Let us not care who's theology is correct, if in fact either one is. My thought is, simply, that people have ideas that they instinctively associate with the word ‘Christian’ that members of the LDS church do not. A few examples would be their version of the trinity, works not being necessary for salvation, and not being able to achieve Godhood because of the uniqueness of their God. If that is the case, then isn't presenting yourself as a ‘Christian’ to someone who is uninformed of LDS beliefs deceptive?”

They then go on to say,

“Please understand that I am only concerned with allowing truthful communication between members and non-members of the Church to occur. Honestly, I think that the LDS church as a whole needs to stop trying to apply the term 'Christian' to itself and invent a new one, just for the sake of honest communication.”

Lindsey, of course, offers his own response to this question[1]. But, since reading this question several months ago, I have wished to express a few thoughts on it. 

First of all, I readily grant that there are things believed by Latter-Day Saints that are not commonly associated with being “Christian.” However, I dispute that this is problematic for communication. On my mission, when talking with various people of various faiths, it was not all that difficult to clearly communicate our different views on the Godhead, salvation, and several other doctrines. These kinds of differences generally came up in the first conversation, right there on the doorstep! In fact, we freely brought them up lots of the time. In no instance that I can remember did anybody feel we were dishonest in representing ourselves as Christians upon discovering these differences.

On the other hand, being in the “Bible Belt” we certainly ran into plenty of real life anti-Mormons who already knew (or thought they knew) our beliefs on those issues. In such cases, no matter how much we insisted that Jesus Christ was at the center of our faith, they refused to acknowledge us as Christians.

Now, if “honest communication” is our aim – as this unnamed critic professes – then let’s consider the one idea that is most “instinctively associated” with the label of Christian. That is, belief in Jesus Christ as Lord, and Savior, and Redeemer, the prophesied Messiah. This is a belief certainly held by Latter-Day Saints, and (again thinking back to on my mission) it is really the only idea I found being “instinctively” and consistently associated with the label Christian by all the lay Christians I had so many discussions with. At the same time, the natural association we have with a label like non-Christian or even Cult is that they don’t believe in Jesus Christ. Now, then, does that sound like “honest communication” to you?

Often when we ran into people who had been told we are a non-Christian cult, then overcoming that stigma and convincing them that we do in fact put our trust and faith in Jesus Christ for salvation was almost an insurmountable obstacle. I remember one girl we met with three times in Portsmouth, VA, whose family kept telling her that we were not Christians. Every time we met with her we had to re-convince her that we believed in Jesus Christ. We showed her several passages in the Book of Mormon every time. It always took the whole time we were with her to finally get her to believe us when we said we believed in Jesus Christ. As a result, we couldn’t get anywhere further with her, and so we had to just stop meeting with her.

My point is simply this: If “honest communication” is the goal, then it is more honest to label Latter-Day Saints as Christians rather than non-Christians, because the ideas most instinctively associated by the label of non-Christian (primarily a lack of belief in Jesus Christ), is far less accurate (and therefore dishonest) then any misconceptions that may arise out of Mormons calling themselves Christians.

----------------------------------------

Notes:

Comments

  1. We may have discussed this before, but do you consider polygamists "Mormon"?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I don't think you and I have discussed it before, but I have shared my thoughts on that issue on another blog (http://lehislibrary.wordpress.com/2010/04/02/are-the-rlds-flds-etc-mormons/)

    In short, I consider anyone who accepts Joseph Smith as a prophet and the BoM as scripture to be Mormon. I assume you mean polygamists who broke off from the LDS Church to continue the practice of poloygamy (since there very well could be other polygamist out there who have and make no affiliation with Mormonism). Yes, I would consider them to be "Mormons."

    Of course, my typical use of the term "Mormon" and "Mormonism" on this blog is in regards to the LDS Church.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ha ha, that's where I remember your talking about this issue! Yeah, I've already read your post there.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

“The Dominant Narrative is Not True”: Some Thoughts on Recent Remarks by Richard Bushman

The following is making its rounds on Facebook (from this video): Questioner: In your view do you see room in Mormonism for several narratives of a religious experience or do you think that in order for the Church to remain strong they would have to hold to that dominant narrative?
Richard Bushman: I think that for the Church to remain strong it has to reconstruct its narrative. The dominant narrative is not true; it can’t be sustained. The Church has to absorb all this new information or it will be on very shaky grounds and that's what it is trying to do and it will be a strain for a lot of people, older people especially. But I think it has to change. As I have seen this quote flash across my Facebook news feed and thought about how to make sense of it, I have been reminded of the short essay response questions I would often have on tests or assignments in college or even high school. It would not be uncommon for these questions to be built around a quote from an important schola…

Unpublished Book by John L. Sorenson Now Available Online

Whether critics of the LDS faith know it or not, John L. Sorenson’s work on transoceanic voyaging in pre-Columbian times has garnered considerable respect among at least some non-LDS scholars. His publications on the subject span across six decades, and appear in a variety of peer-reviewed and academic publications, such as El México Antigo, New England Antiquities Research Association Newsletter, Man Across the Sea: Problems of Pre-Columbian Contacts (published by the University of Texas Press), Contact and Exchange in the Ancient World (published by the University of Hawai’i), and Sino-Platonic Papers (published by the University of Pennsylvania).
He has co-published a 2-volume annotated bibliography of the literature on pre-Columbian contacts, which received some positive reviews. He also co-wrote (with a non-Mormon scholar) World Trade and Biological Exchange before 1492, detailing all the biological evidence for transoceanic contact before Columbus. In a letter thanking Sorenso…